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VIII 2010 – Rogerley and Scotland, part I

 
   Usually we spend holiday time on Madagascar, but, because of various reasons, not this time... In July we just realized that we had no trip program for August, and very soon we decided to visit the famous Rogerley mine in the UK. Jesse Fisher, one of the mine owners, invited us already several times but we never were able to visit them – becaue they work only from June to August each year. When we decided to go to Rogerley where we always wanted to go and we also decide to fulfill our „dreams” – to visit other famous Northern UK localities and Scotland! We had only 2 weeks for this trip and very busy program, but of course as always, „life verified” our program.
    We flew from Warsaw directly to the Prestwick airport where we thought we booked a car. We reserved  it at  DCH Scotland company (beware of them!), but... nobody came to the airport!! Finally after several calls, and waiting 3 hours somebody came with an apolgy and proposed us bigger car in the same price. We thought then that they were OK, only – we were wrong.... Car didn`t work very well from the beginning but we didn`t care to much about it.
Second problem was that Asia – driver – had been never driving at  the left side of the road and she was afraid. But, surprisingly, there was no problem at all during all trip – she was a great left side driver!
    A few hours after our start from Prestwick we came to Weardale –which is famous for occurances of superb fluorites. First of all we had to find the Rogerley mine, which is quite well hidden – at the bottom of the quarry, in  the small forest. When we came there we met Jesse who just finished his work – they just blasted and until the next day nobody could enter to the mine.
    This is a good time to mention very important thing – Rogerley mine is NOT OPEN for public! This is commercial mine, and no visiting and collecting is allowed there. A lot of collectors came there without permission and cause a lot of problem for the mine owners. So, visiting mine is forbidden, unless you are not invited by the owners. If you really HAVE to do go there – ask Jesse or Cal before. All contacts can be found on www.ukminingventures.com
    From Rogerley we went to our accommodation place – St. John`s Chapel – very nice, classic English small town with buildings built of the local limestones. Our place was about 30 meters from home rented by Jesse crew. We spent great days in Dorothy and Derek B&B.
    After coming to St. John`s Chapel we met Cal Greaber – co-owner of the mine – and his wife Kerith. Also Greg was there for some time – he is a brother of Byron. Byron was very important part of Rogerley crew and good friend of Jesse, unfortunately he just passed away after a fight with his illness. Atmosphere understandably wasn’t very optimistic, and everybody was thinking about the funeral of Byron. We was thinking not to isturb them and leave them alone, but we were very surprised that  they just prepared the dinner to which we were invited (thank you Kerith!). After the dinner we wend to the famous „Blue Bell” pub (after this name was named one of the best ever pockets in the Rogerley mine) to drink a few local beers. It was really great – classic local pub, friends and beer. I have to say that I was quite happy that I was not at some wild, hot and roadless place on Madagascar :-)
    Next day we were attacked by „traditional english breakfast” - beware if you go to the UK! I do not remember everything what was on breakfast but surely there were: toasts, grilled sausages, beckon, fried eggs, big plate of been in tomato sauce, smoked haddock,... It was impossible to eat that! Only Asia was very happy – she lakes  big breakfasts very much.
    After breakfast we got in the car and start to drive to Rogerley. But on the way gears were completely blocked – Asia could use only „3”. Hopefully we came back to St. John`s Chapel and Dorothy and Derek helped us very much calling for local technical service. They came after 1 hour and „repaired” the gears. Finally we left to the mine.
    Jesse with Cal were there already. First of all we put „mining” equipment – helmets with lamps, gummys,I took hammer and chisel and Asia took the camera. First of all Jesse guided us through the mine. We saw the remains of all famous pockets – from the first one – Black Sheep Pocket (also named after the local brewery) to the Rat Tail Pocket. At the front we saw the main minerlized vein by which mine is following. This vein, as many others in Weardale area, is crossing Carboniferous limestone. Very often some leyers of limestone are metastasized and than great pockets with fluorites appear. Usually they are parallel to layers shape , so, they are almost horizontal. Size of pockets is franges rom a few centimeters to a few meters. They contained different quality crystals – from mat, small, and very cloudy grey crystals to big, gem, sharp beautiful twins. Of course Rogerley crew looks for the second ones :-) In number if pockets crystals are coated by calcite coatings which can be easily removed. Also almost all pockets are filled by clay – probably post glacial. Unfortunately the majority of pockets are very crushed and brecciated with broken crystals. This is also probably effect of glacial activity in this area. Zone mined in Rogerley was very proned to the glacial influence because  it  lies very shallow below the surface. This is the reason why really top specimens are so rare and so highly priced. During 12 years of the activity of the mine they found only two pockets with top quality specimens – Blue Bell and Jewell Box. And this year was quiet poor in terms of good quality specimens.
    During the mining process explosives are used – of course not too strong to not to destroy the specimens. Beside of drilling equipment the most useful tool is water under pressure. Because pockets are filled by clay, water is great tool to clean it and extract brecciated parts. If some good specimens are in the walls or roof of pockets special big diamond saw is used (very messy!).
    We were surprised how small the mine was– only about 250 meters. We were also surprised how many pockets and fluorites were there... soon I went crazy :-) Asia started to take pictures and I started to work. First I worked in Black Sheep pocket and later in the West Cross Cut (Rat Tail Pocket). During a few ours I was very dirty and had a few nice specimens. Asia in this time had hundreds of pictures.
    Working myself in the mine I realized how difficult  it is to extract good specimen. Surprisingly fluorites from Rogerley have no cleavage (sic!) but they very easily fall apart from matrix. Of course all zones with easily accessible good fluorites were cleaned out, but in some more difficult pales there was still was a lot  to do. I was quiet proud of my finds. They looked especially well in the sunlight. As probably all collectors know Rogerley fluorites are most famous because of  their incredible daylight and UV light fluorescence. So, my green specimens, brought to the sun became blue.
    We met with all others miners – majority of the team was working on pockets at the front of the mine – and we all were very muddy. Only Asia was quiet clean... We were showing each other who found what kind of specimens. This what I collected was apparently good enough that they decided to blast that area next day.
    After washing specimens and packing them we went with Jesse to the short drive too see sunshine from one of the hills. There was a incredible view – with very green grass, numerous ships, small houses, and characteristic stony walls streching out everywhere.
    We spent another great evening testing local food in small familiar restaurant and … drinking beer in Blue Bell. In the evening our car had problems again– sign „important engine faulty” was lon – so we called mechanist again but he said that everything was OK.
    The majority of next day we spent visiting other localities in Weardale area. As I mentioned at the begging this is classic, famous area. Mining was most active here in XVII and XIX century, and during this period production of specimens was the biggest. Today all mines, beside Rogerley, are closed. Some of them are accessible but majority are flooded. Goal of our trip was to see remains of classic mines, and check dumps.
    First we visited Burtree Pasture mine. Remains of this mine are still well visible – shaft (without any constructions), adit to one tunnel, numerous dumps. It is easy to see that before it was a big mining center.
    Second on our road was Allenheads. In the center of the village there is still the main shaft preserved as a monument, and in old mining buildings there is a lot of souvenirs of mining period. At the small square , near hotel, there are mining train used as flower pots.
    From Allenheads we moved to Frazer`s Hush but there was almost no mining traces beside of small dumps. From there the best preserved mining area id visible visible – Groverake. This mine was closed as a last one – in the 90ties. A lot of buildings, shaft constructions, two mine adits are still there. During the „visit in the office” of the mine we found a lot of documents lying everywhere, lockers of the miners with still visible names on them etc.
    Next stop was one of the most famous mines in the area – Boltsburn. This mine, flooded at the begging of XX century produced fluorites which can aspire to be one of the best from the area. Today two entrances to the main are still visible, but the mine is almost completely flooded. In gardens of surrounding buildings sometime you can see blocks of well crystalized purple fluorites – last remains of great minerals from this mine. In  the local pub visitors can see old photos showing mine during its activity.
    Ending that tour we were very impressed by the scale of the workings which were made in XVII and XIX century – this was a huge mining area! We concluded also that if you look for old adits to the mines you have to look for the fences – if you see them you can be sure – there was the mine!
After the lunch in local restaurant we came back to Rogerley. Jesse told us that they did not find any good pockets, but are in progress of drilling the area were I was working the day before. We spent a few hours in the mine, working mainly at the main vein. This time we didn`t have too much luck – we found only a few medium quality specimens. When working day was finished we moved back to St. John`s Chapel and after shower and few beers we went to another local great restaurant.
    Next day we left Rogerley - our plan was to go to Caldbeck Fells and to the Western Cumbrian Orefield. In the morning we set off to Caldbeck, visiting on the way beautiful castle – Hutton in the Forest. In Caldbeck we checked the trail which we were planing to use after few days. Later we went through very beautiful area of Lake District. On the way we visited center of research were we picked up our permission for collecting in Caldbeck Fells area. At the evening we start to move to Egremont were we planned to spend night, but.... Our car got finally completely broken. And then the real horror begun. We parked in the middle of the forest in the mountains on the small road we had only Polish mobiles. First we called to the rental company but they did not seem to be very interested in our problem. Coverage in the mountains was very poor so every 1-2 minutes we were loosing connection. We tried to call to mechanical service at the phone given by rental company... but it was a number available from the UK mobiles! Luckily we were planning to meet with our friend Jolyon Ralph who was coming from London. He told us that he wwould ill be at the place were we stopped in 1 hour – that was a light of hope :-) We were still trying to call the hire company but they were completely not interested in helping us, even calling to rescue service! Finally we splited – I asked some tourists to call  the rescue service but... we didn`t know the number of the road and without that they could not come! Asia went to look for some houses and luckily she found some nice people who called to service and knew the road number! They  rescue company told that they would come in 1 hour... After 1,5 hours Jolyon came with his 4WD car – we were rescued (thank you Jolyon!). But service was still not coming. After several more phones to them and to the rental company – which did not pick up the phone at the urgent number – and after another 2 hours rescue service truck appeared... After short talk we decided to take the car and move to the place were there was a coverage to call car hire company to ask what we should to do now. But they did not pick up the phone... we were calling over 20 times! We were very nervous and decided to leave the car on parking. Guy from the service didn`t know what he should have done and didn`t want to take the car and we didn`t want too loose more time. We moved our stuff to Jolyon`s car and spent the night in „Truck heaven” hotel near the motorway.
    We decided not to go to Ergemont because we lost a lot of time and we didn’t have our car. Finally we went to Caldbeck to visit the famous Roughton Gill mine. Mine is located in the middle of Caldbeck fells National park. Trail going there is serrounded by beautiful scenery. On the day off our visite clouds were hanging very low but there was no rain. After about 1 hour walk we came to the dumps of the mine. Dumps were at the bottom of small valley. We looked for some nice specimens – mine is famous for great pyromorphite, linarite, hemimorphite – but we found only a few poor specimens. Majority of the minerals on the dump are secondary cu minerals.
    From dumps we moved up along very steep stream with number of small waterfalls. Finally  between small waterfalls 2 mine entrances were visible. One of entrances was partly filled by water, another was accessible. After crossing small stream I entered to the tunnel– it was built probably in XVIII century but still preserved very well. Narrow tunnel was following a thin vein. Traces of fresh collecting were well visible.
    Caldbeck Fells Park is created in big part to preserve archeological mining sites. Mining at this area started very early (XIV century) and a lot of mining remains are still there.
    From Roughton Gill mine we moved looking for Barstow`s Trench, but we were not sure which trench was the right one. Richard Barstow (who dug the trench) was one of the most famous professional English collectors who made a lot of mining looking for mineral specimens, not only in Lake District. Famous Barstow Trench was made for collectors quality specimens.
    We moved up, and after short visit at the old dumps and adit to Mexico mine (also famous for pyromorphites) we reached the top of the rig. From this place we had a great view to the mountains and to the big bay located to the North from Caldbeck Fells. We started going back, and after 1,5 hour walk we came back to our car. We met on the parking the local collectors which were very unpolite, that was a surprise for me that field collectors can be so jealous and selfish.
    After visit in Caldbeck Fells our program was to come back to Weardale. On the way there we stoped for short visit in type locality of barytocalcite at the dumps of Blagill mine. I have to say that this was very unspectacular locality with unspectacular specimens :-)
    At the evening we came to St. John`s Chapel and meet the whole team. Greg  already came back to  the US but Jesse`s and Cal` s friends – a couple of collectors from Oregon (Al and Suzanne) and Ian Jones from London – came the same day as we came. At the evening we all met in the Blue Bell to drink a beer and talk about minerals. It was really nice evening and we spent a lot of time talking about mindat.org (Jolyon is a founder and boss of this famous project).
    Next day was Sunday and  the mine was not working – it is a free day. So guess what crazy collectors, who work 6 days in the muddy mine, do in a free day? They go to dig in the quarry :-) This Sunday we  went first to the mine to take some tools, and then moved to the nearby quarry with so called Sutcliffe Vein where nice fluorites are sometimes found. Vein is located at the top of the quarry wall in a quite dangerous place. To go there you have to go by very steep, almost vertical hill covered with grass. When you are at the vein behind your back there is about 10 meters high cliff... But who cares? We started to work. All around the small pockets with nice purple fluorites were visible, some of them were very gemmy but small. Pockets which were well exposed were already cleaned, but after some work we started to open new ones. Jolyon very soon found a nice big crystal (about 4 cm) on matrix. We were removing big blocks  with Jesse and Asia was taking pictures. After a few hours of work I removed two big specimens from one pocket. One of specimens looked very nice, with about 3 cm big clear cubes, with yellow-purple zones – very different from Rogerley fluorites. Probably most difficult part of the day was to bring specimens to the car – going back the same way on the steepy stope. Fortunately Jesse helped me (thanks Jesse), so finally we arrived to the car. We came back to the mine to leave tools and clean specimens. After washing specimen was looking quiet impressive, after removing calcite it may be very nice (see pictures)! I was really happy!
    Later we visited a local collector, incredible person – Helen Wilkinson. She lives near St. John`s Chapel and is one of the most knowledgable persons about mines and collecting places in Weardale and not only! She has visited all accessible mines and majority of not accessible ones. Majority of specimens in her collection are self collected – some of them are really top quality! In her collection you can see wide range of all kinds of specimens from the area. After visiting Helen we moved to Blue Bell to drink a few beers.
    Primary program of Jolyon was to come back to London on Sunday afternoon, but finally he changed program and stayed one more day. So, new program was that he will go with us on Monday morning to Newcastle to rent a new car and that we will be back to Weardale and he will go back to London. Hopefully we found easily small, but very good car. We were ready to go back and than Jolyon changed his mind again – he decided to stay one more night in St. John`s Chapel :-) After coming back to Weardale we went back to collect in Sutcliffe vein and again we collected some nice specimens. These evening Jolyon didn`t want to drink a beer because next day he had to start going home back at 5 o clock in the morning (poor guy).
    Our original plan was to leave Weardale finally and move in direction of Scotlan but... we decided to go again to Sutcliffe vein. We spend there a few hours, cleaned completely the pocket, and than we were really ready to go. We went to the mine to leave tools and to say good buy to all friends.
    This was almost the end of geological part of the trip. We moved to NE to see incredible Scottish castles and the same day we arrived to classic locality - Leadhills where we spent the evening. In this huge mining area all mines are closed but it is possible to see museum or even to drive by special mining train! Everywhere around on the hills  there are the dumps. On some of them pyromorphites can be collected, but we didn`t have a luck to find anything good enough to take with us. The same day we arrived to Stirling where we were surprised by a completel lack of free places to sleep! After 3 hours at 2 am. when we checked already almost all hotels, B&B etc we finally found a nice, small room.
    Stirling is a famous historical town – castle located was a symbol of ruling Scotland – who owned the castle ruled the country! History of this town was very stormy. Castle wasn`t very impressive and we were only impressed by great exhibition in kings` kitchens. After visiting the castle we moved to see William Wallace monument – build in XIX century to memorize the most famous Scottish national hero who organized the biggest Scottish uprising. This very unusual monument – build in the form of high tower located on the top of the hill – was undoubtedly worth to visit. Most interesting thing which is possible to see there is a original, huge, double-handed sword of Terry Wales.
    After the visit in Stirling we moved to Glamis castle – most incredible castle which we saw during our visit. It was builded in XII century and then rebuilded several times. Not so long ago UK queen still was living there. In the castle you can see a real mixture of all styles from XII to XX century. Most impressive was one of the rooms in XV century part of the castle where the original paintings from XVI-XVII century were put together, with some fernitures from XIX century and pictures from XX century – incredible eclectic.
    We were quite fast this day so we had enough time to go the same day to the North to the locality recommended by Jolyon – Lochan-na-Lairig. Of course just when we arrived to the right place the heavy rain started. We did not care too much about it so we got completly wet. We were in the middle of the mountains, in the area with big, long lakes and bald mountains. Locality Lochan-na-Lairig is famous for rutile crystals occurring in quartz building and white leucosomes in gneiss. Best place to collect is a beach of reservoir ended by big dam. To reach the right beach you have to go through the dam and then you have to crash white quartz boudins. Unfortunately rain and wind was so strong that when we came to the beach we were already very wet. After 20 minutes crushing all white rocks around we found ... nothing. It started to be so cold that we decided to come back to the car. As soon as we came back rain stopped. We were so cold that we had to change but we did not give up. We decided to go to another end of the reservoir and try to collect there. We had more luck here! Weather was much better ans Asia (!) as a first found some rutiles (normally I allways find specimens what makes her angry :-) ). During about an hour when found a few specimens but  to be honest – these are not really good rutiles. However we were happy to be alone in the middle of mountains and collect minerals. When  it got dark we moved to the valley were we easily found very nice spot to sleep. These evening we ate great food with beer in the local restaurant. That was the last geological point of our trip.
    The rest of trip was a very romantic travel through whole Scotland – we saw beautiful landscapes, castles, small forgotten villages and incredible coast – but this was a private, non mineralogical part of the trip :-)
    After coming back home we still did not receive refund from DCH Scotland car hire company – beware of them, this is a vary bad company!
    Soon after coming we moved to another trip through Europe but this will be another story!

Tomasz Praszkier

See Rogerley specimens in our store.
See Rogerley specimens on our ebay.

 

 

Map showing area we visited during the trip. Map from Google Earth.


We lended in Prestwick and the same day we set off directly to Weardale.

 

Weardale - the famous fluorite valley.

 

The boundary of  Weardale. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Typical landscapes in the Weardale area. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

 

A flock of sheep and green grass. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Typical landscapes in the Weardale area. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Typical landscapes in the Weardale area. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Typical landscapes in the Weardale area. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

The most important localities in Weardale - note how many of them are there! From mindat.org

 

Map from `Mineralogical Record` showing the most important Weardale localities,
note how many of them are there!

 

At the begining a small tour of the calssic and almost completely gone mines in the Weardale area.
Remains of old, famous, mine - Burtree Pasture. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of old, famous, mine - Burtree Pasture, Weadale. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of another famous Weadale locality - Allenheads. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Old shaft in the center of Allenheads. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

View to Frazer`s Hush workings and the Groverake mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

The best preserved mine in the area, closed in the 90ties - Groverake mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

The best preserved mine in the area, closed in the 90ties - Groverake mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

The main shaft of Groverake mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Decline ramp of the Groverake mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Decline ramp of the Groverake mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Old tunnel of the Grovareke mine - 1878. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Miners lockers with still visible names of miners on them, Groverake mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Cupboard for informations who is on the surface and who is underground - now a swallow`s home,
Groverake mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Demolished entrance to Boltsbourn mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Demolished entrance to Boltsbourn mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of Boltsbourn fluorites in somebody`s garden, Rookhope. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of Boltsbourn fluorites in somebody`s garden, Rookhope. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Small tour of Weardale fluorites - all from collection and photographed by Jesse Fisher - thank you Jesse!
First fluorite from Boultsborn mine, 6 cm. Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Twinned fluorite from Heights quarry, 6 cm. Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Fluorite from Heights quarry, 10 cm. Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Twinned fluorite from Blackdene mine, 7 cm. Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Twinned fluorite from the Blue Circle quarry, 6 cm. Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Remains of the old smelting industry. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

The main base of Rogerley mine at the bottom of the quarry. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Stairs to the main adit to Rogerley. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

In front of the adit there is a place for cutting specimens and for the main train which brings
material to the dump.Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Me and the entrence to the famous Rogerley! Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Basic equipment which you will need visiting any mine :-) Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Inside Rogerley mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Inside Rogerley mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Inside Rogerley mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Lining in the West Cross Cut. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Main train used to transport the rocks. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Mine owners - Jesse Fisher (green coat) and Cal Graber (yellow coat). Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of the Rat Tail pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

This is how unattractive the majority of pockets looks like - brecciated rocks with postglacial clay.
Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Cal and Jesse working on muddy pocket using one of most importent tools - water under pressure. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of the Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

I am working in the Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of the Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

I am working in Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of the Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of the Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Me in the mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of the Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

I am working in the Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of the Rat Tail pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of the Rat Tail pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

I am working in the Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Remains of theBlack Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

I am working in Black Sheep pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

I am working in Rat Tail pocket. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Specimen collected in Rat Tail pocket - note green color. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

The same specimen in the daylight - note blue color. This is famous what Rogerley is famous for -  daylight fluorescence! Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Another specimen from the Rat Tail pocket - note green color. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

The same soecimen in the daylight. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Me and the specimens I collected during the first visit in the mine. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

One of collected specimens in the daylight. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Specimen collected by Jesse in the artificial light. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

The same specimen in the daylight. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

We would like to show you also archive pictures of the great finds in Rogerley and some great specimens.
Here specimens from one of the best pockets ever - Blue Bell collected in 2009. Fot. J. Fisher.

 

Another freshly mined specimen. Fot. J. Fisher.

 

Specimens collected in the 2010 season in the Rat Tail pocket. Fot. J. Fisher.

 

One of the specimens showed in the previous picture after cleaning and in the different light.
Coll. Spirifer. Fot. J. Fisher.

 

One of the specimens showed in the previous picture after cleaning and in the different light.
Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Great specimen from the Rat Hole pocket, 15 cm. Coll and photo J. Fisher.

 

Superb Rogerley specimen in the daylight with well visible blue fluorescence. Fot. J. Ralph.

 

Great specimen from the Blue Bell pocket, very green in the artificial light. Size 13 cm. Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

The same specimen in the daylight with strong blue fluorescence. Size 13 cm. Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

One of the best specimens ever collected in Rogerley! Fot. J. Fisher.

 

Jesse with specimen from the picture above - one of the best! Fot. M. Alferova.

 

Superb twins from Jewell Box, 7 cm. Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Rare specimen - fluorite on quartz - from the Rat Hole pocket, 12 cm! Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Superb cabinet size specimen from the Jewell Box, 15 cm! Coll. and photo J. Fisher.

 

Very nice specimen sold by Spirifer Minerals. Fot. G. Bijak.

 

Specimen showed in tree different light types - here in the daylight. Specimen was sold by Spirifer Minerals.
Fot. G. Bijak.

 

The same specimen in the artificial light. Fot. G. Bijak.

 

The same specimen in the UV light. Fot. G. Bijak.

 

Another great specimen sold by Spirifer Minerals, photographed in the artificial light. Fot. G. Bijak.

 

Gem twined fluorite in the artificial light. Fot. G. Bijak.

 

The same fluorite photographed in the daylight. Fot. G. Bijak.

 

Famous Blue Bell pub in St. John`s Chapel - athe Blue Bell pocket was named after it. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Cal and Jesse in the Blue Bell pub (not pocket :-) drinking beer after day of work in the mine.
Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

From Weardale we drove to the Caldbeck Fells.

 

On the way to Caldbeck we visited spectacular castle in Hutton-in-the-Forest. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Castle in Hutton-in-the-Forest. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Castle in Hutton-in-the-Forest. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Castle in Hutton-in-the-Forest. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Beautiful garden near the castle in Hutton-in-the-Forest. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Asia in the garden. Fot. T. Praszkier.

 

Strange museum showing mining excavators, near Keswick. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

Cloudy landscape in the Caldbeck area. Fot. J. Gajowniczek.

 

GO TO PART II




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